Blaming the Cheese- Part 2

So if we don’t blame the cheese, what should we blame?

If autism isn’t the real problem, what is?

Well, some people believe vaccines are to blame. There’s a heated debate about whether vaccines cause autism and new information seems to be added to that debate every day. The problem is that people are looking for a single solution. Yes, vaccines probably can cause autism, but most likely this is only the cause in a small number of children. And even if it is vaccines, it is more than likely the mercury content in those vaccines. So really mercury poisoning is to blame, not autism.

Then, once you get past all the causes of autism, what is to blame for the hard things that come with autism?

Things like self injurious behaviors aren’t really from autism as much as they are from other things that interfere with autism. For example, a child could self injure because they have a medical problem causing them pain and are either trying to communicate that problem or trying to distract themselves from that pain. Or they could self injure because it focuses their attention on something tangible rather than the intangible anxiety or uncomfortableness of their environment. So in those cases, medical problems or anxiety are to blame.

When it comes to not being able to make friends or being bullied because you have autism, shouldn’t it be society and our skewed ideals that are to blame? If we valued people despite their disabilities or differences, these problems wouldn’t be so prevalent.

 

What I’m trying to say is that blaming autism isn’t always the most beneficial or correct thing to do. Some things are autism, but some things aren’t. Blaming autism for everything that’s hard or any time something goes wrong leads children and adults to believe that they’re broken. It leads people with autism to feel damaged, unworthy, not good enough. Because even when we can hide our autism and blend in, sometimes we still feel autistic and if being autistic is equated with everything negative, it’s easy to extrapolate that to yourself. Then we become broken people and even if you’re a broken person, you still don’t want to feel broken…